East german km 87 bayonet

At Arusha the first inspection of a company of Askari was held, The spirit and discipline of the black unit revealed the admirable education they had received at the hands of my predecessor, Colonel Freiherr von Schleuntz; but, m accordance with the hitherto accepted principles of thieir employment, their training for lighting against an enemy with modern armament had been developed to a lesser degree. Like the majority of the Askari companies, this company was still armed with the old 1871 pattern rifle, using smoky powder. The opinion was widely held that for black troops this was more suitable than a modern rifle with smokeless powder, for they had hitherto never been employed against an opponent with modern armament, but only in native warfare, where the larger caliber is an advantage, while the disadvantage of smoke is of no consequence. After the outbreak of war, indeed, the enthusiastic supporters of the 1871 rifle changed their minds. Against an enemy provided with modern smokeless equipment the smoky rifle was, not only at the long ranges obtaining in the open plain, but also in bush-fighting, where the combatants are often but. a few paces apart, decidedly inferior. The man using smokeless powder remains invisible, while the cloud of smoke betrays the enemy with rapidity and certainty, not only to the sharp eye of the native Askari, but even to the European accustomed to office work. Thus, at the beginnig of the war, the greatest reward which could be earned by an Askari was to give him a modern captured rifle in place of his old smoky one.

Temporary trenches were also built. When a major attack was planned, assembly trenches would be dug near the front trench. These were used to provide a sheltered place for the waves of attacking troops who would follow the first waves leaving from the front trench. "Saps" were temporary, unmanned, often dead-end utility trenches dug out into no-man's land. They fulfilled a variety of purposes, such as connecting the front trench to a listening post close to the enemy wire or providing an advance "jumping-off" line for a surprise attack. When one side's front line bulged towards the opposition, a salient was formed. The concave trench line facing the salient was called a "re-entrant." Large salients were perilous for their occupants because they could be assailed from three sides.

I was the Commander of D Company in 1983-84.

If I’m reading the map correctly and 236 is the HQ, then the line tank companies were in the barracks 229 and 231 with "A" & "B" in 229 and "C" & "D" in 231. Company offices were in the basement.

"D" Company had troops’ rooms on the first floor. "C" Company had troops’ rooms on the second floor and there were classrooms on the 3d floor.

"A" & "B" were set up similarly.

Mess hall was in building 230.

HHC had the 226/227/228 building set with the aid station located in 227.

Motor pool facilities and tank parking were across the street. Line Companies were in 234 and 235 and the HHC/ Battalion Maintenance was in 233. The motor pools were gravel except for small areas immediately in front of the buildings when I was there although they did convert the parking to concrete after I left.

Postscript (Feb 2014): A relative - Margaret Cooper Smith - visited Lewis's grave in Wimereux in 2005 and left an Aussie flag. Lewis was her great-uncle, her maternal grandmother's brother. She said "My maternal grandmother was Rachel Susan May Cranley (nee Spratt) who died in 1962 aged 72 years. I was 12 years old. I remember my Nanna well and I remember asking her about the family tree back then but I was told that I didn't need to know anything about that as there was nothing to tell! I realised that she had had a hard life. I do not know where Lewis's medals are. My aunt Gwennie would have had them but she died in Feb 2000."

Lewis is also commemorated on a War Memorial at Richmond, Queensland (where his name is spelt wrongly as "Pratt". Poor Lewis!.

Colonel Kress von Kressenstein did all he could to keep the British occupied, launching an attack on 8 April 1915 when a mine was placed in the Suez Canal, which was located and disabled by a patrol, and between 5 and 13 May 1915 he personally led a charge. During the Gallipoli Campaign these tactics were abandoned. Von Kressenstein also demanded German special forces, which were promised to arrive in February 1916, to prepare another expedition against the Canal. He moved to the headquarters of the Fourth Army in Ain Sofar in August, then to the new headquarters in Jerusalem , and waited for the German specialists. [29] [30] However, the Ottoman line of communication was extended towards Egypt, with the completion of the 100-mile (160 km) section of the Ottoman railway to Beersheba, which was opened on 17 October 1915. [31]

East german km 87 bayonet

east german km 87 bayonet

Postscript (Feb 2014): A relative - Margaret Cooper Smith - visited Lewis's grave in Wimereux in 2005 and left an Aussie flag. Lewis was her great-uncle, her maternal grandmother's brother. She said "My maternal grandmother was Rachel Susan May Cranley (nee Spratt) who died in 1962 aged 72 years. I was 12 years old. I remember my Nanna well and I remember asking her about the family tree back then but I was told that I didn't need to know anything about that as there was nothing to tell! I realised that she had had a hard life. I do not know where Lewis's medals are. My aunt Gwennie would have had them but she died in Feb 2000."

Lewis is also commemorated on a War Memorial at Richmond, Queensland (where his name is spelt wrongly as "Pratt". Poor Lewis!.

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